Tokyobling's Blog

September 20th – Bus Day

Posted in Places by tokyobling on September 20, 2014

The first bus to ever run in Japan in was in Kyoto, on the 20th of September 1903. The busline ran from the street crossing near Horikawa Nakatachiuri over to Shichijo and ended in Gion. To commemorate this important development in Japanese civic life, September 20th has been named Bus Day (basu no hi). On this days buses are decorated with special flags, like these buses I saw in Tokyo’s Nezu district last year. There are also many special bus events taking place around the country. If you are interested in buses, or more likely, you have kids that like them, today is your busy day!

By the way, photographing the “displays” of the buses is really difficult, as the lights of the displays flutter at a speed that looks good to the eye but looks terrible in digital photograph. You can trick it by using a very slow shutter speed, but then you get a blurry photo if the bus is moving or you shoot without a stand or tripod. The second photo is a montage of a slow and fast photo. Sorry for ‘shopping!

Japan has any numbers “days” to commemorate something, some of them are annual, some are even monthly! I used to be surprised at the number of special days but not anymore. Personally I enjoy October 1st as it is Coffee Day. It also happens to be the day to celebrate Stamps (the ink kind, not the letter one), Sake (the Japanese kind), Glasses, which relates to Design and also Assistive Technology, International Music, and finally the perfect combo of Perfume and aftershaves, and Septic Tanks!

If you can read Japanese, you can enjoy checking out what is celebrated on your birthday for example!

And for activity tips, there are festivals in Nezu Shrine and Akagi Shrine this weekend.

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Senjuin Temple Closeups – Matsue City

Posted in Places by tokyobling on September 19, 2014

The best way to enjoy a visit to a temple or a shrine in my opinion is to go for the details. Just like older western Churches, temples and shrines in Japan (and indeed in the rest of Asia as well) are absolutely loaded with details all of which carries tons of symbolism and meaning. Most Japanese can’t actually “read” these details either (it is not a lost skill, as these details have long been the domain of specialists and professionals). I have always thought it interesting in Japanese that there is one word for “leg” that covers everything from the hipjoint to the big toe, but there is also a very specific name for each part of the spire on top of a pagoda, with incredible detail. Every time I visit a temple in Japan I learn something new about the symbolism or naming of the different parts of it. Sometimes I take a lot of photos of details to remember them, like with this temple that I visited in Matsue City in Shimane Prefecture, the Senjuin (千手院). This temple is on the slopes of a hill neatly placed to overlook the city and the castle that makes the city famous. The temple belongs to the oldest and largest of the Shingon sect of Buddhism. I was too late in the season to experience the famous weeping cherry blossom tree (shidare sakura) which is over 200 years old. The temple itself is very old but it was moved here in the 19th century after a large fire burned down the original buildings in 1678. If you visit Matsue City and have a bit of free time and the weather is good I recommend visiting this temple if nothing else than for the news.

A few of the interesting details on this temple was the elaborate (even more than usual) bright vermilion ceramic roof finials, complete with the famous kamon (heraldic sign) Gosannokiri which is extremely similar to the official heraldic sign of the prime minister and can be found in all Japanese passports for example (to be honest there are 129 official kamon based on this simple design and it could be anyone of them). I also enjoyed seeing the printed prayer slips pasted on one of the walls which I have never seen in Tokyo (I am sure there must be some). Another one I liked was the little votive painting of the Senjukannon, the buddhist patron saint of people born in the year of the rat and often prayed to by people with poor eyes.

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Bonodori Dance at Hikawa Shrine – Akasaka

Posted in Japanese Traditions, People, Places by tokyobling on September 18, 2014

I hadn’t been to many bonodori festivals this summer so I was happy to find one scheduled for the final night of the large Hikawa Shrine festival in Tokyo’s Minato Ward. The bonodori is a rather complicated dance with music that makes it sound very like Sunday matinee movie from the late 1940s. It takes place around a raised podium where a taiko drummer helps keep the rhythm and it is usually performed in the traditional summer dress of Japan, the yukata (think kimono light). In a land with many dances and tradition thousands of years old it is good to see that new traditions are still slowly being grown, like this kind of dance. I imagine people in 1000 years will be dancing this to the exact same music and with the same movements as we do today.

As many bonodori festivals I have been to, this must surely be the most perfect. The space is not too large, not too small, and above all, it takes place under the trees! The red lanterns combine with the canopy of leaves to create a once in a lifetime perfect “room” for the dance to take place. I might be the only one to notice, but such perfection leaves me in tears these days. When I imagine the ideal bonodori location, this was it. I just didn’t know it really existed. I know bonodori ranks very low on the list of exciting festivals to see or experience, even for local Japanese, but if you are into it, this is the one to visit. It usually starts on the Sunday of the festival at 1830, but music starts much earlier, usually at 17300, and the drummers are always there early to warm up.

The Hikawa Shrine (氷川神社) in Minato Ward (there are hundreds all over Japan) is easily accessible from Akasaka, Tameikesanno, Nogizaka, Roppongi or Roppongi Ichome stations.

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Konnohachimangu – Shibuya Matsuri

Posted in Japanese Traditions, People, Places by tokyobling on September 17, 2014

Sunday was the main day of the large Konnohachimangu festival, or the Shibuya festival. Lots of omikoshi (not as old as the one I blogged about yesterday) gathered for the main blessing ceremony right in front of the famous 109 department store just a stone’s throw from the even more famous Shibuya Scramble street crossing (arguably the center of Japan today). The streets were packed with the many different neighborhood omikoshi, and even though Shibuya is hardly a residential area these days there were plenty of volunteers from outside of the area as well. Although the main ceremony was over in a few minutes the omikoshi teams kept going for hours afterwards, all around Shibuya!

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