Tokyobling's Blog

Shibuya – Green Building

Posted in Places by tokyobling on January 26, 2014

A few years ago fantastic paintings of a post-apocalypse Tokyo started appearing on the net. Tokyo Genso imagined an abandoned Tokyo that has been taken over by nature and vegetation. I always enjoyed those images and every now and then you come across a building or park in Tokyo that has been taken over completely by nature. Here is one fantastic house in Shibuya, not abandoned and not taken over, just beautifully enveloped. I love it.

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Shibuya Matsuri – Omikoshi

Posted in Japanese Traditions, People, Places by tokyobling on November 30, 2013

I took these photos after the rain we had during this year’s Shibuya festival let up. The omikoshi of the famous Dogenzaka neighborhood that traditionally starts in front of Shibuya station and goes up towards Shinsen station was out in force, the only concession to the rain being the plastic wrapped around the paper lanterns.

The origins of the name Dogenzaka is contested, but the slope can be named after an old temple that used to be located on the top of the hill. During the Edo period the road was surrounded by wild woods and fields with a clear view of Mount Fuji at the end. As Edo became Tokyo in the later part of the 19th century Dogenzaka became a market place for farmers selling their produce and Shibuya was developed as modern westernized town with electric street lights and everything. These days it is hard to believe that Dogenzaka was ever anything else than highly developed commercial district, but in fact there is a short row of five buildings that are almost 90 years old and survived several earthquakes and a World War. I will save that story for a later blog post though. There are a few interesting photos on this site of old historical Dogenzaka.

I was suprised to read that 758 people are officially registered as living in Dougenzaka, I think quite a good percentage of them joined in the Shibuya festival and helped carry their omikoshi, men, women and quite a lot of kids! They did a great job stopping the traffic while the omikoshi slowly passed.

Someday I would love to talk to someone who was born and lived all their life in Dogenzaka. They must have some incredible stories to tell!

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Konouhachimangu – Shibuya Grand Shrine

Posted in Japanese Traditions, Places by tokyobling on November 20, 2013

A couple of months ago during the three day festival in Shibuya I went to pay my respects at the Konouhachimanu grand shrine, the official protector shrine of Shibuya and Aoyama. The weather had been bad all day and it had just stopped raining so there were very few people at the actual shrine. The most of the festival takes place in the middle of the commercial areas of Shibuya and since the shrine lies almost hidden between tall buildings and offices not many people actually know that it is there. Founded in 1092, it is one of Tokyo’s older and more important shrines. Despite being so old the shrine’s present priest is quite young and modern minded, so during the festival there are rock bands, jazz bands and even karaoke concerts taking place at the shrine’s main stage, I arrived just in time to see one of the classic old kagura plays being performed, one that I have seen many times before.

Inside the grand shrine grounds there is also a smaller Tamatsukuri Inari shrine (玉造稲荷神社), and besides the shrine there is a Toyosaka Inari shrine (豊栄稲荷神社), both devoted to the God of rice and fertility, with a row of ten torii, red shrine gates leading up to the altar.

The best little piece of trivia though, is that this is also the location of what was once one of the biggest castles in what is now Tokyo! Not many people know that Shibuya had a castle roughly between the 12th and the early 16th centuries, and although the now hidden Shibuya river is slightly more famous, even fewer are aware that it once served as a defensive moat to this hilltop castle. The only remaining piece of this castle is a small stone from one of the walls, tucked away in the shrine grounds. I have been to this shrine many times but never actually noticed the stone. Next time I go I will try to get a photo of it!

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More Shibuya in the Rain

Posted in Places by tokyobling on October 11, 2013

More photos of last weekends Shibuya in the rain! It is fun to take photos of people using umbrellas, walking through rain. The rain and the need to get out is gives people a certain “something” in their look. With a very wide angle lens like the one I used, one of my very few zoom lenses (a 17-35mm f2.8 Nikon), umbrellas tend to block your view as people “sneak up” on you from behind. I also posted one of my mishaps (they usually end up in the trash can of my computer), but I though it looked interesting as an illustration of the lights of Shibuya. You can compare it with a very similar, focused, photo taken a few seconds earlier. In the last photo you can see how restaurant signs keep getting bigger and bigger.

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