Tokyobling's Blog

Mount Fuji From Tokyo

Posted in Places by tokyobling on August 11, 2014

Of the many images associated with Japan, one of the most potent ones must be the silhouette of Mount Fuji. It used to be that you could see Mount Fuji from many places all around Tokyo. This is still reflected in the many place names that have Fujimi (富士見) in them, meaning a place where you can see Mount Fuji. One of the many things we lost when developing Tokyo were the traditional views of Mount Fuji. There are 18 places called Fujimizaka (Slope or Hill where one can see Mount Fuji), but due to the many tall buildings being erected there is none left. The last Fujimizaka where you could actually see Mount Fuji from street level was in Nishinippori, and the view was lost in June 2013 when an 11 story apartment building was put up in the Sendagi neighborhood of Bunkyo Ward. It is almost eerie to read the petitions of the residents near the last Fujimizaka as the words are almost exactly the same as those of the residents of the first place to lose its view, in the early 1800s, more than 200 years ago. The mountain is about 100km away so the only way to see it these days is to get closer or go higher!

I got my first view of Mount Fuji from Tokyo when I visited the Bunkyo Ward Office viewing platform at sunset and caught a glimpse of the mountain in the setting sun. I was lucky and even from such a tall building it is not always visible. Even then, the entire mountain is not visible as the south tower of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Offices are in the way. Still, it is a good thing to see! I guess visiting in the early morning would also be a good way to see Mount Fuji, but I have yet to try it out personally. You can see my earlier post on this tall building here.

tokyo_sunset_bunkyo_ward_office_1285

tokyo_sunset_bunkyo_ward_office_1330

tokyo_sunset_bunkyo_ward_office_1337

tokyo_sunset_bunkyo_ward_office_1388

tokyo_sunset_bunkyo_ward_office_1419

tokyo_sunset_bunkyo_ward_office_1434

tokyo_sunset_bunkyo_ward_office_1444

tokyo_sunset_bunkyo_ward_office_1457

Advertisements

20 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. Borderlands of Health and Wellness said, on August 11, 2014 at 4:59 am

    That is tragic really. Very Sad.

    Like

    • tokyobling said, on August 11, 2014 at 8:21 am

      Well, in exchange we get plenty of places to live in a really cool city… (^-^;)

      Like

      • Borderlands of Health and Wellness said, on August 11, 2014 at 8:30 am

        My uncle lived there for many years and his ex wife is a native. I occasionally wonder about the Japanese juggernaut of the 80’s and how ‘progress’ may have been internalized culturally. I don’t know enough about the culture to do more than pause to note such drastic change in 100 years time.

        Like

        • tokyobling said, on August 12, 2014 at 2:40 am

          Interesting questions and topics and probably not properly delegated to a mere blog post comment thread! I will return to the subject of internalized progress. (^-^)

          Like

  2. Adrian Quilatan said, on August 11, 2014 at 5:10 am

    Oh, that’s just sad. I guess getting natural views blocked really is a consequence of embracing modern living. Also tells a bit about the priorities of the people in power.

    Like

    • tokyobling said, on August 11, 2014 at 8:23 am

      Japan has suprisingly liberal building laws. It is a local disaster but nothing more I guess. You have to travel pretty far west to see Mount Fuji from the street level though.

      Like

  3. Richard said, on August 11, 2014 at 5:23 am

    It is the unfortunate aspect of progress. The one image that I can still see in my mind is Fuji-san silhouetted at sunset in the distance as I looked from the train window on way into Tokyo on my first visit to Japan. The one thing that defined where I was…….

    Like

  4. Andrzej Wisniewski said, on August 11, 2014 at 3:05 pm

    Plus the weather – now summer time, even if you go up some floors – it;s so hazy that you can barely see it. I cant wait for autumn and winter, for more crispy air, to grab some photos. From our office we can occassionaly see it now, if weather permits.

    Like

    • tokyobling said, on August 12, 2014 at 2:41 am

      Yes, winter is the best for crisp views! Congratulations on getting an office with actual views! A rarity in Tokyo! (^-^)

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Angelo said, on August 11, 2014 at 6:29 pm

    Amazing shots.

    I’ve been there a couple of times and I had to travel much more colser to finally see it… And even from Hakone, it was hazy!! Unlucky.

    Like

    • tokyobling said, on August 12, 2014 at 2:42 am

      Not as much unlucky as average! I have been close to Mount Fuji several times and on most occasions you can’t see a thing, even when you are actually on the mountain! For some reason though I always see it when I’m on the Shinkansen going west… (^-^)

      Like

  6. Junko said, on August 11, 2014 at 7:47 pm

    Even if it’s just a teeny glimpse, Mt. Fuji is such a beautiful and magnificent mountain. Yappa, Fuji wa nippon ichi no yma! Fantastic photos!

    Like

  7. romainboitier said, on August 12, 2014 at 1:53 pm

    Very cool. You should check the work of Hiroshi Tashiro who references most of the zones where you can see fuji in japan and also talked a lot about how japaneses expat try to associate the montain and the ones around them wherever they are in the world.

    http://ajw.asahi.com/article/cool_japan/fun_spots/AJ201207190019

    Nice job as usual 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • tokyobling said, on August 13, 2014 at 12:30 am

      Thank you Romain! (^-^) What an interesting article. I suspect local tourist organizations could use this to their advantage!

      Like

  8. Mai said, on August 12, 2014 at 2:09 pm

    Reblogged this on 平穏の場所 and commented:
    *__________*

    Like

  9. […] 「Mount Fuji From Tokyo」Tokyobling’s Blog英語 […]

    Like

  10. Moritz said, on September 4, 2014 at 1:07 pm

    Awesome picture. I’m suprised you got it on your lens from such a distance. Good job!

    Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: