Tokyobling's Blog

Kachidoki Station – Art on the Odeo Line

Posted in Places by tokyobling on March 20, 2014

Many cities around the world are fortunate enough to be equipped with a subway system. The smallest city with a subway system is Rennes in France, but the largest is Tokyo. In fact, we have two subway systems here! The biggest of the two is Tokyo Metro with 9 lines and 176 station, a private company owned by the Tokyo government and the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. The smaller company with only 4 lines and 99 stations is the Toei Subway, owned by the Tokyo Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation. Both systems cover most of Tokyo with the notable exception of the two southernmost wards, Ota and Setagaya which relies almost only on the Toei Subway lines.

The latest addition to the Toei Subway lines was the 2000 Toei Oedo Line that runs almost in a circular loop (with a long tail), completely underground and also the deepest of all Tokyo subway lines: it is 48 meters underground at some points, and tunnels under large rivers three times. When the line was constructed in the 1990s it was decided that all the stations would have an architect and an artist responsible for the look and feel of each station. Although quite toned down, some stations do indeed feel a little “wacky modern”, like the Oedo line Iidabashi station which has a biological theme. Kachidoki Station is the most heavily trafficked single line station in Tokyo with over 82 000 passengers per day. The number has grown so rapidly that new exits has been added and there are plans to extend the Yurikamome line to Kachidoki to coincide with the Tokyo Olympics 2020. The artistic theme of the station was decided by the architect to be “out of the ocean”, to keep with the artificial island nature of Kachidoki itself and the colors of the station and the platform is a green-blue palette. I recently passed the station and had my camera with to take a photo of the rather unusual art piece decorating the ticket gate hall, a huge mural in the style of a classic Italian painting! A rich underground world inhabited by mythical mermaids and Gods looking up at the high-rise buildings towering above the water.

I have always loved this mural and I recognized the style from somewhere, the soft colors, the near perfect representation of an italian tromp Trompe-l’œil renaissance work of art, reminding me of Giulio Quaglio or Andrea Pozzo or even Michelangelo. So I finally checked who the artist was and found it was none other than the famous mural painter Masao Hanawa (塙雅夫)! One of the most famous window dressers in Japan he has won many awards for his work he is also the creator of several murals in everything from museums to hotels both in Japan and abroad, churces and even Disney Sea here in Japan! It is funny how your eyes and heart knows art that your mind can’t even remember sometimes.

I talked to the station manager for a bit and it seems I am not the only one stop and wonder about this mural. He told me it is the most talked about artwork in all the Toei Oedo Line stations. No wonder, it is easily the best, despite the humbleness and “not quite so modern” theme. It also seems like Mr. Hanawa is a graduate of the fantastic Zokei University of Arts (that I have blogged many times about before).

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Bioarchitecture – Subway Station in Iidabashi

Posted in Places by tokyobling on January 8, 2012

Tucked away on the backstreets of a minor Tokyo neighborhood in between Iidabashi and Korakuen is one of the exits to the Toei Oedo line’s Iidabashi station. Next to it is one of several functional subway venting towers, or chimneys for the subways. Usually these vents are hidden aways as best as possible and you wouldn’t know where to find them but this one has been decorated with something the architect himself describe as organic architecture, a theme that is extend along the entire subway line and into the stations, more or less noticeable. I happened to pass there yesterday and was a bit amazed by this building on an otherwise quite backstreet.





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